The Registry

Internship Programme

The Tribunal offers a limited number of internships each year to students and recent graduates of law, international relations, public relations, political science, library science and translation. Interns work under the supervision of Registry officials on matters relevant to the Tribunal’s work. The three-month programme allows students to gain an understanding of the way in which the Tribunal functions and to participate in the work of the Registry. Interns are expected to be able to contribute to the work of the Tribunal in fields such as the law of the sea, public international law, international organizations and international relations, political science, public information, library science and translation.

The next available internships are from July to September 2021. Application deadline: 31 March 2021.

Why an internship with the Tribunal?

If you are considering a career in international law, for example, whether working for a law firm, an international or regional organization or your national government, and if you are interested in a behind-the-scenes experience at an international court, then you are in the right place. Working closely with officials in the Tribunal's Registry, interns have the chance to experience the daily routine of the Registry's different departments, interact with members of the Tribunal, use the extensive library facilities for their research, meet participants of other training programmes and enjoy the challenge of working in a truly international environment. An internship at the Tribunal provides students and recent graduates with a once-in-a-lifetime experience.

Come and join us!

Can I be an intern at the Tribunal?

The following criteria are used to determine eligibility for the internship programme:

Applicants should:

  • have completed at least three years of university studies;
  • normally be engaged in a degree-granting or postgraduate course at the time of application and also during their internship, or be a recent graduate;
  • normally not be more than 35 years of age;
  • have a good command of English and/or French; and
  • have an interest in international law, in particular international law of the sea, international affairs or international institutions and organizations.

Our interns are students or recent graduates from all over the world, all sharing an interest in international law and in particular the law of the sea. Their backgrounds are varied and depend on the department they are attached to: those in the Legal Office have usually completed their first law degree or are already working on a masters in international law or a PhD in a law of the sea-related topic. Library interns should be enrolled in a library science or archival administration course, and interns with Linguistic Services should be enrolled in a translation degree course and be able to work in the two official languages. Press Office interns tend to be students of journalism, media studies or international relations.

In the selection of candidates due consideration is given to geographical diversity and gender balance.

What does an internship entail?

Under the supervision of a Registry staff member, interns carry out assignments for the Registry. Internships are available in the following departments:

Legal Office

The Legal Office consists of four legal officers, working under the supervision of the Head of the Legal Office. The Legal Office works in close cooperation with the Registrar, conducting research on international law, law of the sea and administrative legal matters; examining legal instruments and precedents relating to the work of the Tribunal; drafting judicial reports on questions relating to the work of the Tribunal; serving the meetings of the Tribunal and preparing background material, reports and papers; and providing legal advice on a diverse range of substantive and procedural questions of law as well as on the management and administration of the Registry.

Tasks involved:

  • Interns work under the close supervision of one of the legal officers. They carry out research on a variety of legal issues and prepare notes for their supervisor, the other legal officers, or the Registrar.
  • Interns are also requested to conduct research on a specific topic of their own choice, upon which they prepare a written paper and give an oral presentation to the Legal Office at the end of the internship.
  • Together with other interns serving at the Tribunal, they also prepare the weekly press review covering recent developments in the law of the sea.

Library and Archives

The Library maintains and develops a specialized collection of resources on the law of the sea and public international law with approximately 8,500 monographic titles and over 500 serial titles. It is run by the Head of Library and Archives, who is supported by the associate archivist and the library assistant. The Archives department processes judicial, session, and administrative records and administers the Electronic Document Management System and ITLOS Departmental Archival Database.

Tasks involved:

Library interns assist the Library staff in their day-to-day operations. This includes activities related to acquisitions, cataloguing, database maintenance, collection management support, document processing, compilation of bibliographies and managing electronic resources. They also assist Library users with law library technology.

Linguistic Services

Linguistic Services deal with the translation and revision of legal and judicial texts, administrative documents and other texts, from English into French and vice versa. The Head of Linguistic Services is supported by a team of one translator-reviser, one translator and two linguistic assistants. During cases and administrative and judicial sessions they are joined by interpreters, revisers, translators and verbatim reporters.

Tasks involved:

Interns are involved in translation and document preparation, referencing and research, text alignment for the translation memory system, database management of official documents for reference and archival purposes, terminological research, and the compilation of glossaries and databases.

Press Office

The Press Office serves as the focal point for public information activities for the Tribunal. Press Office tasks include: drafting and disseminating press releases; preparing information material for presentations, events and social media portals; managing the Tribunal's website; organizing visits and events; and responding to inquiries from media representatives and the general public.

Tasks involved:

Interns in the Press Office are involved in the daily tasks of the Press Office, preparing responses to inquiries from the press or general public; drafting public relations material; compiling reviews of and archiving press coverage; assisting with the organization of visits and events; and assembling presentation material.  

Which internship periods are available?

The Tribunal's internship programme is a full-time programme and internships usually cover a period of three months.

Internship periods generally run from January to March, April to June, July to September and October to December, although we try to be flexible in order to accommodate applications from students with different vacation schedules.

Is funding available?

A Trust Fund for the Law of the Sea was established in 2010 with the aim of providing financial assistance to participants from developing countries. A limited amount of funding is available to assist interns with their living and travel costs. 

Contributions for the internship programme have been made to the Trust Fund by the Korea Maritime Institute and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China.

In addition to the requirements for participation in the programme, the following criteria apply in determining eligibility for internship funding:

(a) Applicants must be nationals of a developing country included on the OECD list and should normally be resident in that country; and

(b) Applicants should be in need of financial assistance to help cover the travel and living costs associated with an internship in Hamburg.

Candidates should indicate their interest in applying for funding in the online application form. Late applications for funding will not be considered.

Important considerations

  • Cost: Interns do not receive any remuneration. Travel and accommodation costs, as well as living expenses, are the responsibility of interns or their sponsoring institutions. Those awarded funding from the Trust Fund for the Law of the Sea receive a monthly allowance to assist with living expenses.
  • Visa: Interns are responsible for obtaining and financing the necessary visas for Germany. Assistance with the procedure for securing a visa is provided by the internship coordinator where necessary.
  • Travel: Interns arrange and finance their travel to Hamburg. Those awarded funding from the Trust Fund for the Law of the Sea may receive financial assistance with their travel costs.
  • Accommodation: Interns are responsible for arranging their accommodation in Hamburg. An information sheet on temporary accommodation is provided by the internship coordinator and some assistance in finding a room may be provided.
  • Medical insurance: Interns must provide proof of adequate health/accident insurance coverage and a medical certificate stating that they are in good health and able to travel to Hamburg. The Tribunal accepts no responsibility for costs arising from accidents and/or illness during an internship. 
  • Confidentiality: Interns must keep confidential any and all unpublished information obtained during the course of the internship and may not publish any reports or papers based on such information even after completion of the internship.
  • Certificate: Upon successful completion of the internship, interns receive a certificate stating the period of internship, giving examples of the allocated tasks and evaluating the intern's performance.

How do I apply?

If you are interested in participating in the internship programme at the Tribunal in Hamburg you should submit:

  • The duly completed online application form;
  • A covering letter no more than one page in length, explaining why an internship at the Tribunal is important to you, how it would fit in with your academic and career goals, and what benefits you expect to derive from the programme;
  • A résumé/curriculum vitae;
  • A brief sample of research work in English or French of no more than 10 pages, if possible on a topic of relevance to the work of the Tribunal; 
  • Copies of a document as proof of your enrolment in a university course, your university degrees/diplomas and a list of courses taken or grade transcript;
  • References; and
  • Language certificates, where relevant.

Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Candidates who are nationals of a developing country included in the OECD list intending to apply for funding should indicate their intention to do so in the online application form. Late applications for funding will not be considered.

Applications should be sent to the Tribunal to meet the deadlines below:

Internship period

  • January to March: application to be submitted by 30 September of previous year
  • April to June: application to be submitted by 31 December of previous year
  • July to September: application to be submitted by 31 March
  • October to December: application to be submitted by 30 June

What is the goal of the Tribunal’s internship programme?

The programme is designed to give interns the opportunity to gain an understanding of the work and functions of the Tribunal and to enable the Tribunal and its members to benefit from the assistance of persons with relevant knowledge and skills in areas within the scope of activities of the Tribunal.

How many internships are available each year?

Approximately 20.  

Do I have to be a law student to be eligible?

Not necessarily. Candidates from the following fields of study may apply for an internship:

  • Law of the sea/public international law
  • International relations/Political science
  • Library science/Archival administration
  • Translation
  • Communications/Journalism/Media studies

I am a recent graduate and would like to apply. Am I still eligible?

Yes. Candidates who have graduated within a period of 12 months prior to submitting an application are considered eligible. 

I have already started working. Can I still apply?

No. Only students or recent graduates can apply for the programme.

What qualifications are required?

Candidates should:

  • have completed at least three years of university studies;
  • normally be engaged in a degree-granting or postgraduate course at the time of application and also during the internship, or be a recent graduate;
  • be studying subjects such as law of the sea, public international law, international organizations and international relations, political science, public information, publications and library science, translation;
  • have a good command of English and/or French.

Is there an age limit?

Candidates should normally not be more than 35 years of age.

What kind of tasks are involved?

Internships are offered in the following departments:

  • Legal Office
  • Library and Archives
  • Linguistic Services
  • Press Office

Legal Office

The Legal Office consists of four legal officers, working under the supervision of the Head of the Legal Office. The Legal Office works in close cooperation with the Registrar, conducting research on international law, law of the sea and administrative legal matters; examining legal instruments and precedents relating to the work of the Tribunal; drafting judicial reports on questions relating to the work of the Tribunal; serving the meetings of the Tribunal and preparing background material, reports and papers; and providing legal advice on a diverse range of substantive and procedural questions of law as well as on the management and administration of the Registry.

Tasks involved:

  • Interns work under the close supervision of one of the legal officers. They carry out research on a variety of legal issues and prepare notes for their supervisor, the other legal officers, or the Registrar.
  • Interns are also requested to conduct research on a specific topic of their own choice, upon which they prepare a written paper and give an oral presentation to the Legal Office at the end of the internship.
  • Together with other interns serving at the Tribunal, they also prepare the weekly press review covering recent developments in the law of the sea.

Library and Archives

The Library maintains and develops a specialized collection of resources on the law of the sea and public international law with approximately 8,500 monographic titles and over 500 serial titles. It is run by the Head of Library and Archives, who is supported by the associate archivist and the library assistant. The Archives department processes judicial, session, and administrative records and administers the Electronic Document Management System and ITLOS Departmental Archival Database.

Tasks involved:

Library interns assist the Library staff in their day-to-day operations. This includes activities related to acquisitions, cataloguing, database maintenance, collection management support, document processing, compilation of bibliographies and managing electronic resources. They also assist Library users with law library technology.

Linguistic Services

Linguistic Services deal with the translation and revision of legal and judicial texts, administrative documents and other texts, from English into French and vice versa. The Head of Linguistic Services is supported by a team of one translator-reviser, one translator and two linguistic assistants. During cases and administrative and judicial sessions they are joined by interpreters, revisers, translators and verbatim reporters.

Tasks involved:

Interns are involved in translation and document preparation, referencing and research, text alignment for the translation memory system, database management of official documents for reference and archival purposes, terminological research, and the compilation of glossaries and databases.

Press Office

The Press Office serves as the focal point for public information activities for the Tribunal. Press Office tasks include: drafting and disseminating press releases; preparing information material for presentations, events and social media portals; managing the Tribunal's website; organizing visits and events; and responding to inquiries from media representatives and the general public.

Tasks involved:

Interns in the Press Office are involved in the daily tasks of the Press Office, preparing responses to inquiries from the press or general public; drafting public relations material; compiling reviews of and archiving press coverage; assisting with the organization of visits and events; and assembling presentation material.  

What documents to I need to include in my application?

Obligatory:

  • online application form;
  • a covering letter no more than one page in length explaining why an internship at the Tribunal is important to you, how it would fit in with your academic and career goals and what benefits you expect to derive from the programme;
  • Résumé/curriculum vitae.

Optional:

  • A brief sample of research work, in English or French of no more than 10 pages, if possible on a topic of relevance to the work of the Tribunal; 
  • Copies of a document showing you are enrolled in a university course, your university degrees/diplomas and a list of courses taken or grade transcript;
  • References;
  • Language certificates.

Please note: Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Should I send original documents?

If you are unable to submit your application online and choose to send your application by post, original documents should not be submitted to the Tribunal as applications are not returned.

My university transcripts are not in English or French. Do I need to include a translation?

Yes. All documents accompanying your application should be in either English or French. If they are in another language, you should provide a translation of your documents in either English or French.

What kind of research sample should I send and how long should it be?

You should submit an example of your coursework or research, where possible on a topic of relevance to the work of the Tribunal. This should be no more than 10 pages in length.

My degree is taught in one of the official languages. Do I still need to provide language certificates with the application?

No. If your course is held in either English or French you do not need to provide certificates.

Will I be paid or receive funding for my internship?

Internships are not remunerated. Travel and accommodation costs as well as living expenses are the responsibility of the interns.

Candidates from a developing country on the OECD list and normally resident in that country may apply for funding from the Trust Fund for the Law of the Sea.

How can I apply for funding?

In addition to the requirements for participation in the programme, the following criteria apply in determining eligibility for internship funding:

(a) applicants must be nationals of a developing country on the OECD list and should normally be resident in that country; and

(b) applicants should be in need of financial assistance to help cover the travel and living costs associated with an internship in Hamburg.

Candidates should indicate their interest in applying for funding in the online application form. Late applications for funding will not be considered.

What are the application deadlines?

The application deadlines depend on the period you would like to apply for:

  • January to March: 30 September of previous year
  • April to June: 31 December of previous year
  • July to September: 31 March
  • October to December: 30 June

Can I still send my application when the deadline has passed?

No. Applications received after the deadline will not be considered. 

What is the duration of an internship? 

Internships usually run for a period of three months: from January to March, April to June, July to September and October to December.

Does the Tribunal offer part-time internship positions?

No. The Tribunal only offers full-time internships.

Can an internship be postponed?

No. We cannot guarantee that a place on the programme will be available at a later date.

I would like to apply for a summer internship but my vacation dates do not match the internship periods. Can I still apply?

While our summer internship periods usually run from July to September, we do try to be flexible in order to accommodate applications from students with different vacation periods. If you would like to apply for a summer internship please do so using the online application form. Under #15 (Internship period) please include the exact dates of your availability. Applications for summer internships should reach us by 31 December of the year before you would like to participate in the programme.

Will I receive confirmation that my application has been received?

An automatic response confirming the receipt of your application should be received upon submission of the application form. If you do not receive such an email please contact the Press Office.

How are interns selected?

After the closure of the application period, applications are reviewed by the Internship Selection Committee. The final decision is taken by the Registrar with the approval of the President of the Tribunal.

How and when will I be informed about the Selection Committee's decision?

The internship coordinator contacts all applicants by email approximately one month after the closure of the application period.

Is it possible to find out the results earlier?

No. Applications for a given period are reviewed together as soon as the application deadline has passed. You do not need to contact the Tribunal in the meantime to check the status of your application.

Is there a dress code at the Tribunal?

There is no official dress code but interns are expected to wear smart or casual business attire.

Do I get credits for my internship?

You should check with your university as to whether they award credits for internships.

Will I receive a certificate at the end of the internship?

Yes. The certificate states the period of internship, gives examples of the allocated tasks, and evaluates the intern's performance.

How much does it cost to live in Hamburg?

The monthly rent of a furnished room in a shared apartment is approximately €300 - 500. Monthly living costs (food, public transport, etc.) can also amount  to between €300 - 500.

Will I receive help with finding accommodation in Hamburg?

Yes. An information sheet on temporary accommodation in Hamburg is sent to all interns. While it is the interns’ responsibility to arrange accommodation, some assistance in finding a room is given if necessary.

Do I need to have health insurance?

Yes. The Tribunal accepts no responsibility for costs arising from accidents and/or illness during an internship. Interns must therefore show proof of valid regular as well as major medical insurance and provide a medical certificate stating that they are in good health.

Will I receive help in obtaining a visa for the internship?

Interns are responsible for obtaining and financing the necessary visas for Germany. A list of States whose nationals need a visa may be found on the website of the Foreign Office of the Federal Republic of Germany. Assistance with the procedure for securing a visa may be provided by the internship coordinator where necessary.

Where can I obtain further information?

If you have any further questions about the programme please contact the internship coordinator.

 

382 interns have participated in the programme since 1997. Meet a few of them and read some of their comments on the programme:

   

Mr Yannick Roucou, Seychelles

My time at the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea was truly memorable. Daily duties included the compilation of press reviews relating to law of the sea which the interns and I would list and forward to the Press Office at the end of each week; research on different subjects assigned to us by our supervisors; and working on our individual research papers. Occasionally we were approached by the judges to assist them with research on a particular topic. I was fortunate enough to witness a case - Italy v. India - which was the highlight of my time at the Tribunal.

In addition to our research work, we tried to maintain an active social life and make the most of our time in Hamburg. We would gather in the Villa for lunch often in the company of some other staff members, when we would each prepare and share dishes. At the weekends, we would meet up in the city centre for a meal or a drink and recount stories about our culture and traditions. Some of us even took the opportunity to visit neighbouring countries like Denmark and the Netherlands when time permitted.

 

  

 

Ms Sarah Lohschelder, Germany

What is unique about an internship at ITLOS is the very specialized subject matter. As someone with a rather general background in public international law, I have already learned a lot of substantive law during my time here. An internship at the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea demonstrates interest and experience in the law of the sea, maritime law and oceanic environmental issues and is a great credential to have on my resume for future job applications in the field.

 

 

 

Mr Sebastian Preller Borquez, Chile

The opportunity to get to know an international institution from the inside has always attracted me. Through the internship programme, the Tribunal allows interested people to experience at close-hand the daily work of the institution and put a face to the abstract concept of an international organization.

During my internship I had the chance to meet interesting people with whom I could share experiences and ideas. The collection of documents on the law of the sea and other fields of international law is fascinating; you may well spend days browsing their catalogue. Finally, but also very important, the work environment at the Tribunal really made my stay run smoothly.

 

   

 

Mr Lucian Indries, Romania

I believe that the experience of working in an international institution – like the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea – is exceptional training for a future career in international law. This unique experience has been essential for my personal and professional development, because I got used to the rigour necessary for performing in an international institution of such a calibre. I would advise all those interested in this internship to apply because it is an opportunity worth seizing!

 

   

 

Ms Basant Abdel-Meguid, Egypt

My interest in the law of the sea encouraged me to apply for an internship at ITLOS as I wanted to see first-hand how it works from the inside – I was eager to experience the legal and research work.

I believe the most important thing was being exposed to different topics, being very precise and concise with the research I produced, and being able to present it properly. Gaining an insight into an international court, working with the legal officers, interacting with judges, and meeting fellows who are young professionals in the field are very positive element of the internship. It expanded my knowledge and focus in different law of the sea-related topics.

 

   

 

Ms Catherine Blanchard, Canada

The work varies according to the tasks the supervisors assign to the interns: legal research; helping to draft statements and lectures; proofreading; compiling documents; etc. In between the work there are the coffee-breaks and “pot luck lunches” shared with the other interns and some of the staff members. And when the weather and time allow, the keen runners amongst us can go jogging along the Elbe!

 

   

 

Mr Saeed Hashemilalehabadi, Iran

It was one of my best experiences ever since the time I started working on the law of the sea. Working in an extremely friendly atmosphere on my research paper under the supervision of an experienced legal officer and helping him with the documentation for the cases, attending the hearing and watching how the States, the judges and the advocates act in an international courtroom is something never to be forgotten. Thank you ITLOS!

 

   

 

 

 

 

Ms Yousra Bennani, Morocco

What I really appreciated was seeing how hearings proceed, both inside the courtroom and behind the scenes. I also enjoyed the interaction with the members of the Legal Office, who are always ready to give advice and provide information. The attributes which I found useful were organizational skills and curiosity in the sense of being eager to learn and to understand. The internship also allowed me to develop certain skills, such as asking the right questions from the legal point of view and drafting precisely the topics I was dealing with. I am very happy to have been able to follow this internship, which will be really useful in future, since I wish to continue with legal research.

My advice to candidates applying for the internship is to take advantage of every minute of the programme, don’t hesitate to approach the members of the Legal Office, and glean the maximum information and replies to questions of concern to you.

 

 

 

Mr Jean Raoul Meles Esmel, Côte d’Ivoire

Interns who are curious and keen to learn will not be disappointed. The Tribunal has a comprehensive library with an abundance of recent physical and electronic resources. In addition, each intern is supervised by a qualified legal officer, all as kind and approachable as each other, even for the interns not under their supervision.

 

 

 

Ms Klaudia Malczewska, Poland

I applied for the internship programme because of the unique chance to have an insight into the work of the Tribunal, gain a better understanding of the law of the sea and improve my legal skills. Being an intern at ITLOS was a life-changing experience. I had an opportunity to observe the procedure in cases on the docket and see top-class international lawyers and jurists at work. I met people from all around the world who share the same interests and built a network with them. The internship helped me clarify my future plans, was an asset to my PhD thesis, and made me set new goals for myself. The Tribunal and the city of Hamburg are great and friendly places to spend three months.

 

   

 

Mr William Phalen, United States of America

In addition to the legal skills that I have garnered during my time as an intern, the network and connections I made with the legal staff, fellow interns, Nippon fellows, and administrative staff will have a lasting and positive impact on my career after the internship. The internship programme does an excellent job providing opportunities for interns to interact with the judges, full-time staff, and Nippon fellows. My advice to students interested in seeking a full-time internship at the Tribunal is to come in with an open mind and be excited to work on any project, whether or not it is directly related to your specific field of interest. Some of my most interesting assignments were in areas of the law of the sea I did not think I was interested in at the outset.

 

 

 

Ms Sindhura Polepalli, India

I was very interested in understanding the practical application of the concepts I had pursued academically in the field of the law of the sea. The Tribunal was the most appropriate platform to grant me this exposure. What I really like about the internship is the cordial work environment and the fact that I can contribute to international peace through legal research. It has offered an in‐depth understanding of concepts in the field of the law of the sea which are of practical significance. Hence, the internship has been a platform for me in gaining expertise. For those considering applying for the programme I would recommend that you study ITLOS jurisprudence and look at the biographies of its members. The former will enable you to easily grasp ITLOS procedures when interning and the latter will enable you to have informed dialogue with the judges.

 

 

 

Mr Nicolas Cordoba, Colombia

I applied for the programme because of its growing prestige and outreach, for its substantive work in adjudication and investigation, and for a first-hand total “immersion” in international law practice. Work discipline, substantive legal drafting and very good research skills are required. The ability to perform in a multicultural environment is the most important skill one can learn – or improve – by interning here.

It is not just one-of-a-kind work, but a one-of-a-kind life experience. I think, and hope, that this time will serve as a key for furthering and developing my career as an international law practitioner. Any work or study you want to pursue afterwards will have the unique label provided by having interned at ITLOS. The result is all about what you do with the time you have here.

 

   

 

Mr Tolulope Balugon, Nigeria

My IT knowledge and information management skills are useful in performing some of the duties assigned to me. I have gained new skills in working with a different type of system for managing electronic records at the Tribunal, and SirsiDynix Symphony used by the Library, which is one of the best integrated library systems.

The internship experience will be a useful addition to my work experience. I wish to work in an international organization and the exposure and experience will help my career.

 

 

 

Mr Arnaud van Laere, Belgium

During working hours, I mainly translated session documents, press releases and annexes, but that was not all. The work of a legal translator also involves a close reading of the Tribunal’s documents (parties’ written pleadings, case law, etc.) in order to assimilate as far as possible the legal turns of phrase, expressions and terms used by ITLOS. Monday mornings were devoted to drafting the press review (together with the other interns).

Apart from allowing me to work in an international environment, this internship enabled me to gain familiarity with legal translation, one of the most complex branches of translating. Also, the members of Linguistic Services are very friendly and came to help me as soon as I started at the Tribunal, helping to create a very good working atmosphere.

 

 

 

Mr Wenlan Yang, China

The most memorable part about the ITLOS internship is the people I met during my three months of working at the Legal Office. It is a rare opportunity to work with and learn from extremely friendly experts in your area of interest who are willing to offer unreserved opinions and share their experiences. Through the internship with the Tribunal, I gained a greater insight into the practical aspect of international dispute resolution and the law of the sea, improved skills required for working in an international environment, and, most importantly, became more prepared and confident for building my career in teaching and practising international law.

 

 

Ms Wendy Okun, Kenya

As a recent graduate in international maritime law, I thought that an internship at the Tribunal was the only logical next step. However, I was in for a surprise: the multicultural environment and vast wealth of experience of the various professionals was beyond anything I have ever seen. The internship also enabled me to meet people from all walks of life and to see and pursue opportunities that I could only dream of as a girl from Kenya. I am taking away with me invaluable knowledge that will enable me to enhance my skills and position myself in the field of international law.

For any aspiring young lawyer looking to apply for the internship I would strongly recommend and encourage them to do so. It is a decision that will change your life forever.

Since the programme began in 1997, we have welcomed 382 interns from 100 States. They are now part of the ITLOS Alumni Network.

Further information may be obtained from: 

The Internship Coordinator
International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea 
Am Internationalen Seegerichtshof 1
22609 Hamburg
Germany  

Tel.: (49) 40 35607-227/181
Fax: (49) 40 35607-245

press@itlos.org